Category Archives: Finances

Articles concerning finances. This is the “budget” Epicurean after all.

Adulting is Hard; I’m Ready

 

So a while ago, my husband and I had the opportunity to host a wine tasting. I know, sounds totally grown up right?

I’m lucky enough that my mom knows a lady she went to nursing school with ‘back in the day’, who now lives near the beach and owns a wine store. This lady also has a daughter near the same age as I, (we used to hang out together, ‘mom friend’ free babysitting ftw) who happens to now live & work in the same area of the Triangle! Life’s full of crazy coincidences, am I right?

They offered to bring the wine, while I invite friends and supply the house & food. Hopefully said friends then buy their wine, and it’s a win win for everyone!

During this wine tasting, we were chatting with some people there. And during the conversation they kindly complimented our (modest) home, at which point my friend said something to the effect of:
Oh yeah, they are like real adults, they have their shit together!

Hubs and I looked at each other and laughed.

Later that week though, we had a long discussion about it. We both felt that the statement was inaccurate, since we didn’t feel like adults. We both found it amusing that others saw us and thought we had it all figured out.

Though, when we thought about it, we do a lot of “adult” things now. Like having a bedtime before 10pm, staying in a lot more often, enjoying red wines like Merlot & Syrah instead of Moscato and Ice Wine, and contributing to our work 401K plans and our own other investment accounts.

Maybe we are, like, real adults now? 

And from there came some more lightbulb moments.

It’s all about perspective

What is success to one person may be utter failure to another. For example, we met because we were both admitted to a PhD program in Human Medical Genetics & Genomics. Sounds impressive right? Well, turns out we both left that PhD program within 3 years. Not quite as impressive huh?

But it was the right choice for us, and we don’t regret it one bit, because it brought us together, along with many other friends and experiences we wouldn’t have had otherwise.

We also struggle with comparing ourselves to others we read about. When you dive deep into FIRE bloggers, it becomes a balancing act that is easy to lose between admiring those who became millionaires by 30, and becoming utterly despondent when you realize that it will not happen for you due to the choices you’ve made.

While there will always be people who seem to have it “more together”, there will also always be people who are way more of a train wreck. The best person to judge your life by, is past you

You are your worst critic

We all have things we wish we could change. We wish we had picked a different school, had chosen different roommates, tried a different career path, lived closer to work, didn’t move to that city, asked that guy out on the train, had kids earlier, or later, or not at all.

Life is too short to allow yourself to get caught up in the whirlwind that is comparison and negative thoughts.

Whenever I find myself getting depressed that my retirement account balance hadn’t hit 6 figures by the time I graduated college (hahaha, or even existed…), I remind myself to be thankful that I now have a job that gives me regular raises, a 401K, and matching.

If I catch myself thinking about where I could be salary wise if only I’d gotten a job right out of college rather than pursuing another 6 years of post-graduate education, I look back over my multiple career hops that catapulted me from $14/hr into a comfortable  salary range in 3 years.

The best person to measure yourself against, is yourself. Click To Tweet

Think back on your life from last month, last year, 5 years ago, or 20 years ago. And think of all the things you have accomplished, and hopefully changed for the better. Life is a marathon, not a sprint. 

No one really has it ‘figured out’. No one.

If you have an honest conversation with your parents, grandparents, parents of your friends, mentors or older coworkers, they may admit to feeling all these things too at some point in their lives. Maybe they even still feel that way today, in denial about how old their own “babies” are, or the fact that they are old enough for retirement.

Most people seem to have an age between 16 and 40 where they mentally stop aging. No matter what they look like physically, in their mind they always feel that young. Growing pains and a fear and dislike of “becoming an adult” are not new to our generation.

However we do have many significant differences in our world today vs. our parents’ or grandparents’ generations.

It’s true that millennials today are taking longer to achieve the milestones that we associate with adulthood. We are waiting longer to get married, if we even getting married at all. We are waiting longer to have children, if we even have children at all. We are more dependent on our parents, less likely to be financially independent, and seem to have “lost the map” on the road to growing up.

The mistake here is confusing “growing up” with “giving up” or “settling”, thinking an adult is someone who is resigned to living a dull, complacent life, going through the archetypical boring steps of a mundane repetitive job, accepting conventional thoughts, and never growing or changing.

But in fact, growing up is more of an awakening. It is realizing that you need to know important life skills to survive on your own in this world like all the DIY knowledge Handy Millennial shares. Growing up is paying your own bills with your own money, making that money work for you, making your own doctors appointments and taking control of your health, especially if you have a close call like Mrs. PP.

When you talk about growing up in this sense, no one is ever really “grown up”—it’s a constant balancing act, a perpetual state of learning and changing and growing. Adulting is hard. But no matter what age you are, you are never to old to learn, explore, and change your mind. Growing up is about the journey, not the destination. 

Everyone has different strengths and weaknesses

Becoming, and the endless process of being, an adult, sometimes seems like a long endless list of chores.

Take out trash, do the dishes, do the laundry, put it away, go get groceries, cook dinner, do more dishes, meal plan, budget, pay the rent, remember birthdays, send a card, fix the wobbly table, get an oil change, remember wiper fluid, fill the tank, make a doctors appointment, check portfolio balances, price-compare day cares, take fluffy to the vet, fill prescriptions, cut the lawn…

Anyone else feel their blood pressure rising with every word?

It is better to not focus on all the things you “can” and “should” and “will” do as an adult, and work smarter not harder. Sometimes, it is okay to trade your money for your time. Pursuing FIRE is about trading money now for time later. But there are times in life, when in the interest of maintaining sanity and quality of life, you should trade your money now for your time now.

Sometimes, money actually can buy happiness.

Maybe you are in a critical and stressful point of your career, or just became new parents, have an aging parent to care for, or have a physical reason you cannot do tasks you were once able to do. If you cannot handle your own lawn maintenance, laundry, housework, oil changes, or taxes, it is okay to recognize and admit that.

You also need to recognize that you cannot be good at every thing. And that is okay. In fact, that is preferable!

Imagine if everyone on the planet only wanted to farm all day. We would have mountains of grain, corn, and vegetables, all the fresh dairy and meat and eggs we could eat. But then, how would we get new clothes, shoes, or sheets, who would be sorting and delivering the mail, running businesses, or governing? No one can do every thing, but everyone can do something.

The point is, try different things until you find those things that you excel at, and preferably also enjoy doing. That is where you will find your happy place. And if you can also find a way to get paid for those things? You have totally nailed adulting.

This also directly relates to dating, relationships, and marriage.

There will be some things that you are really good at; maybe you love doing dishes or balancing the household budget. Look for a partner who compliments you, and fills in the gaps in your skills. Recognize what you bring to the table, and appreciate what they are good at as well, to keep a balanced and healthy relationship. Team work makes the dream work.

Life is a series of choices

You can choose to stay up all night playing games. But you know that you will be tired the next day. You can choose to spend every penny of your paycheck. But know that you are tightening those golden handcuffs. You can choose to continue expensive hobbies, nights out on the town, and big yearly vacations. The trade-off is your money, time, and freedom.

You can also choose to eat right and exercise, starting now. Know that you are elongating your lifetime and improving your experience of it. You can choose to make a budget and meal plan and learn to cook at home. The trade off is less time for other pursuits, but a higher quality of food for yourself, and a valuable life skill.

Choose fun. Choose gratitude. Choose grace. Choose friendships. Choose self love. Choose to stay young at heart.

Choose to listen to and ACT on this advice on how to become financially secure by 30 from the wise women at Bitches Get Riches. Don’t make my mistakes and delay getting a “real job” (aka “real money”) and especially don’t delay investing! Even if you have no idea what you’re doing, any dollars is more than zero dollars.

Make the better choices, and reap the rewards of a long and happy life full of financial security and freedom. Make the wrong choices, and you may be staring at a retirement far, far away, that will be anything but financially secure.

Lessons Learned

With mere days remaining until I ring in my 30th year on this planet, this may be the first birthday since turning 19 that I’ve “felt” older. I have achieved almost all of the ephemeral “goals” society holds up as evidence of adulthood, like a career, a stable income, solid savings, marriage, and a home that we own.

But truly, I feel like I’ve grown as a person, and come to terms with many physical and financial truths this past year. I’ve finally taken control of my investing, and begun executing a plan for my path to Financial Independence. No more funneling a percent of my check away every month, never to be thought of again. (Don’t get me wrong though, I still have SO MUCH to learn.)

I’ve recognized the effects of age in a physical sense through the slowing of my metabolism, the agony of maybe actually needing to use under-eye concealer someday soon, and the vengeance of a hangover these days. I’ve gotten over my initial denial and temper tantrums, and created an actual plan to lose weight and feel healthier, and put it into place. And guess what? It’s working!

I choose to have a positive perspective, to keep making the right choices for my mind, body, and financial future. One day at a time, one dollar at a time, one grueling ten minute workout at a time, one home cooked whole foods meal at a time. I am building the best and strongest future that I can, each and every day. Adulting is hard, but I’m ready for it.

I can’t wait to see what awesomeness awaits in my 30s & in 2018!

 

How about y’all, any words of wisdom from those who are good at adulting? Or those who have no idea what they’re doing! All are welcome here.

The 12 Days of FI Christmas!

For a little holiday fun, I Dream of FIRE, My Sons Father, and yours truly, the Budget Epicurean, have put together a fun-filled Financial Independence related take on the 12 Days of Christmas! if you’d like to know the full story of how this creative genius came about, the post is right here on I Dream of Fire’s site.

Featuring financial lyrics and several of the top FI bloggers of all time, we hope you enjoy our music video:

Full lyrics

On the first day of Christmas my good friend gave to me
A paid-off mortgage (debt free!)

On the second day of Christmas my good friend gave to me
2 IRAs and a paid-off mortgage (debt free!)

On the third day of Christmas my good friend gave to me
3 Vanguard funds, 2 IRAs and a paid-off mortgage (debt free!)

On the fourth day of Christmas my good friend gave to me
A 4 percent withdrawal rate, 3 Vanguard funds, 2 IRAs and a paid-off mortgage (debt free!)

On the fifth day of Christmas my good friend gave to me
5 rewards cards, a 4 percent withdrawal rate, 3 Vanguard funds, 2 IRAs and a paid-off mortgage (debt free!)

On the sixth day of Christmas my good friend gave to me
6 tax write-offs, 5 rewards cards, a 4 percent withdrawal rate, 3 Vanguard funds, 2 IRAs and a paid-off mortgage (debt free!)

On the seventh day of Christmas my good friend gave to me
7 percent markets, 6 tax write-offs, 5 rewards cards, a 4 percent withdrawal rate, 3 Vanguard funds, 2 IRAs and a paid-off mortgage (debt free!)

On the eighth day of Christmas my good friend gave to me
8 Bogle books, 7 percent markets, 6 tax write-offs, 5 rewards cards, a 4 percent withdrawal rate, 3 Vanguard funds, 2 IRAs and a paid-off mortgage (debt free!)

On the ninth day of Christmas my good friend gave to me
9 dividend stocks, 8 Bogle books, 7 percent markets, 6 tax write-offs, 5 rewards cards, a 4 percent withdrawal rate, 3 Vanguard funds, 2 IRAs and a paid-off mortgage (debt free!)

On the tenth day of Christmas my good friend gave to me
10 rental houses, 9 dividend stocks, 8 Bogle books, 7 percent markets, 6 tax write-offs, 5 rewards cards, a 4 percent withdrawal rate, 3 Vanguard funds, 2 IRAs and a paid-off mortgage (debt free!)

On the eleventh day of Christmas my good friend gave to me
11-year-old cars, 10 rental houses, 9 dividend stocks, 8 Bogle books, 7 percent markets, 6 tax write-offs, 5 rewards cards, a 4 percent withdrawal rate, 3 Vanguard funds, 2 IRAs and a paid-off mortgage (debt free!)

On the twelfth day of Christmas my good friend gave to me
12 months of YNAB, 11-year-old cars, 10 rental houses, 9 dividend stocks, 8 Bogle books, 7 percent markets, 6 tax write-offs, 5 rewards cards, a 4 percent withdrawal rate, 3 Vanguard funds, 2 IRAs and a paid-off mortgage (debt free!)

Featuring (lego) appearances by:

Just click the links to go to their blogs, and find out more! Thanks for watching and reading, have a Merry Christmas & Happy New Year!

Think this is awesome? Tell all your friends! And share it on Twitter:

Check out the 12 Days of FI Christmas music video! https://youtu.be/9rOS6ZENyX4 via @I_dream_of_FIRE, @My_Sons_Father, & @budgetepicurean Click To Tweet

Ultimate Epicurean Gift Guide

Obligatory Disclaimer: This blog is part of the Amazon Affiliate program. If you click on some links and purchase products, this blog receives a small payment at no extra charge to you. This is in part how we keep the good stuff coming, so thank you!

 

When you need to get a gift for someone, but you don’t really know what to buy, you inevitably turn to the internet to help with your search. Whether you are counting down the days until Christmas and frantically trolling through Amazon or ThisIsWhyImBroke, or you have a birthday, wedding, a baby shower, anniversary, or a house warming coming up, everyone has got to eat & drink.

Anyone who is a frequent home cook, aspires to be a more frequent home cook, or is just a lover of food is bound to find most of these things useful. All of the items on this list are things which I personally have and use, or would be thrilled to receive as a gift! I’ve researched the best brands and deals, so you don’t have to.

Obviously, if you already have an Amazon Prime membership, the free 2-day shipping is an added bonus. If you want to try a FREE 30-day trial, sign up here! But even without it, you have enough time until Christmas if you order now.

Price Range: $5 – $20

Rbnexia Metal Long Chopsticks Set of 10: $5.99

If your giftee likes to make their own sushi, or often enjoys eating sushi or other Asian-inspired meals, consider this lovely set of chopsticks. Stainless steel metal chopsticks are reusable, and dishwasher safe. Think of all the bamboo saved by using these year after year rather than the disposable packs from Sushi Palace.

Tea Spot Steep & Go in Green Tea: $8.95

This is the Steep & Go adaptable tea strainer I reviewed a few years back, and it is still going strong. With adaptable rings to fit to almost any bottle size, this little guy makes having your tea anytime, anywhere a breeze. No hot water required. By the way, there were only 19 left as of writing this, so get to it! If Amazon happens to be out, you can check the Tea Spot’s website for other cool steepware options, as well as all kinds of teas to go along with your gift.

Amazon Basics Silicone Baking Mat Set of 2: $9.62

Silicone baking mats are a gift from above to regular bakers. For holiday cookie making, easy cleanup after roasting, to fruit leathers and protecting your counters from dough and mess, silicone mats can do just about anything parchment paper or aluminum foil can do, but they are freezer, oven, and dishwasher safe and reusable up to 1000 times!

Bamboo Cutting Boards Set of 3 Sizes: $12.99

A key aspect of healthy cooking is lots of fresh produce, and possibly protein from meats. But it is important to keep those items separate while prepping. With this set of 3 different size cutting boards, it is no problem to know where to cut the peppers and where to cut the chicken. Bamboo is also a highly eco-friendly material, as bamboo is fast-growing and easy to cultivate, while the handles allow for ease of grabbing them out of cupboards.

Desert Creek Cinnamon Creamed Honey: $14.57

If you haven’t tried creamed honey, you haven’t lived! It is honey, but creamy. I don’t know how to describe it, just trust me, it is delicious. Try it on fresh hot toast, in your tea, or on top of desserts.

Stainless Steel Chilling Stones: $14.99

These reusable chilling stones are like ice cubes that won’t water down your drinks. Keep them in the freezer, and you will be ready any time for ice cold whiskey, wine, orange juice, tea, or water, but without the extra water. Well, maybe you don’t need these in your water but… you do you.

Glass Caffeine Mug with Silly Scale on Back: $15.00

Coffee is what makes the world go ’round and powers the adult world. If your giftee is a java-lover, and/or a science nerd, they are bound to giggle at this chemically accurate mug with accompanying accurate silly scale on the opposite side. Watch them go from Zombie to Genius as they sip their morning cup-a-joe.

Justin’s Nut Butter Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups: $15.02

Justin’s Nut Butters does some great work, and makes some amazingly delicious products. Especially their Almond Butter. This is the cleanest substitute for a Reese’s addict like myself. Chocolate and Peanut Butter are just meant for each other. I’ve got one waiting for me after my holiday diet wraps up in January!

Cuisinart Set of Three Strainers: $15.47

I received this exact set of strainers as a wedding gift, and had no idea at the time how critical they would become in my kitchen! The large strainer is perfect for making my homemade chicken stock, to get out all the little bits of carrot and herbs and leave a clear stock for making minestrone, ham and white bean soup, and chicken tortilla soup. The smaller one is perfect for straining kombucha, to make sure no chunks of SCOBY get into the finished product, or to make loose leaf tea drinkable (since I lost my mana-tea).

EcoDefy Automatic Soap Dispenser: $15.95

We all know that moment when your hands are covered in bread dough, icing, or raw chicken, and you need to wash your hands. But how do you get soap and turn on the water without contaminating your whole sink?! Automatic soap dispensers were one of the best investments we made when we first moved into our house. We ended up buying one at first for our kitchen, and loved it so much there is now one in every bathroom as well. You will also need 4 AAA batteries per dispenser, and maybe some soap to go with it. I like the Softsoap moisturizing Milk & Golden Honey.

Multiuse Silicone Dishwasher Safe Spoon Rest: $15.99

If you’re like me, you usually have at least two if not five different utensils sitting in or around your spoon rest at one time. You may need a spatula, whisk, spaghetti spoon and soup ladle all in one day. The spoon rest gets crowded, the utensils awkwardly fall off the side, and your counter is covered in sauce. No more! This silicone, dishwasher safe set of 2 rests has you covered from any angle.

Or, for the more whimsical among us, this adorable “I licked the spoon” kitty cat spoon rest: $13.18

 

Hammond Candies Holiday Classics Hard Candies: $17.00

The Hammond’s Candies factory in Denver, Colorado has been in operation since 1920 making holiday classics like candy canes, peppermint sticks, and ribbon candies. Transport yourself back in time with this Holiday Classics assortment of hard candies in an adorable holiday tin.

Ovente Black 1.5L Glass Electric Tea Kettle: $18.99

When you want to heat up more water than would fit in one cup in the microwave, but don’t want to wait until a pot on the stove boils, an electric kettle is the perfect answer. I find that the 1.5 L size is about right for 3 cups of hot tea, and it stays hot enough throughout all three cups. This one has a handy LED light that turns blue when it’s boiling, and a stay-cool pouring handle.

Haitian Organic Superfood Dark Chocolate 5 Pack: $19.90

These beautiful 70% dark chocolate bars are nonGMO, vegan, gluten-free, soy free, filled with superfoods, made in Haiti, and Fair trade certified. That’s a big mouthful to say; delicious!

Mr. Kitchen Glass & Steel 8 Cup French Press: $19.95

I have this exact 32 oz size, and it makes more than enough for 2 large steaming cups of coffee, or a double batch of hot loose leaf green tea. Perfect for when you don’t want to make two trips, or have more than one person to serve. The double filter keeps grounds and leaves out of your cup, and makes the perfect, smooth cup of coffee without the bitter aftertaste. Use together with the electric kettle above for the perfect hot beverage.

Glass Locking Oven Safe Meal Prep Containers:$19.99

Definitely one of the most-used gifts I’ve ever received, these glass containers make meal planning and food storage a dream. The lids lock in place, meaning they are completely spill proof. Never again will you have to clean out spilled chili from your lunch box, or wipe fruit juice off your refrigerator shelf. They are also completely oven, freezer, dishwasher, and microwave safe, meaning you can transport your food straight from cooked to frozen and back to the microwave for lunch without a second thought.

Amish Country Hull-less Popping Corn 4 Pack: $20.88

Popcorn is an awesome frugal snack, and can be made easily on the stove top with oil, using an air popper, or by putting 1/4 cup kernels and 1 tbsp oil in a paper bag and microwaving it. This set of 4 types is hulless, meaning less “digging in your teeth and gums for days after eating it”, and more enjoying.

Price Range: $21 – $35

Reversible Memory Foam Anti-Fatigue Chef’s Mat: $22.99

Our kitchen has a memory foam mat which was purchased on a whim when we first moved in. It has turned out to be one of my favorite kitchen accessories, as it really keeps your feet and back from getting sore after hours of slaving over the stove  😉

Kusmi Teas – One Moment Assortment of 5 Flavors: $26.50

This is a brand I found on our honeymoon in France, and fell in love with. When I came back to the states, I immediately put it on my Christmas wish list. My current favorite is their “Spicy Chocolate” black tea from their “Afternoon Teas” set.

18-Piece Canning Starter Set: $26.99

Dang, for less than $30 you can get your friend or family member started on a lifelong skill that can save thousands of dollars over the years. All you need is a large pot to boil the jars, and you are on your way to making home-canned peachescanning your own beans, and preserving garden fresh salsa and pasta sauce. This set comes with 4 quarts and 4 pints with lids, a funnel, and a recipe book. May I also suggest these Tattler reusable canning rings & lids for extra savings?

Hamilton Beach 7 Quart Programmable Slow Cooker: $29.96

I actually did a double take when I looked this one up. Slow cookers are so affordable, it is silly to not have one! All you need to do is make 2 home-cooked meals rather than go out to a restaurant and it’s paid for itself. You can of course get a low-maintenance basic one, and those run even less. I recommend the larger one if you’re cooking for two or more, or do big batches to freeze. Slow cookers can save you money in so many ways:

  • Make big batches of cheap staples like rice or beans
  • Save money by making crazy-cheap soups and stews
  • Cheap cuts of meat become fork tender with long-time cooking
  • Home cooking is easier & faster with minimal prep
  • Avoids the temptation to just order take-out or pizza
  • Cook ahead and freeze extra for instant meals later
Simply Gourmet Stainless Steel Measuring Cups & Spoons: $29.99

These spoons are extra-long, which is handy if you need to get the last tablespoon of baking soda out of the box. The cups and spoons have a hole in the handle, which means you can easily add an O-ring to connect them all together, and avoid digging through your drawer looking for the size you need.

Hottest Hot Sauce Gift Set 4 Pack: $29.99

I had to throw this one in there since I’m a Carolina girl now, and have recently acquired some Carolina Reaper peppers. This is legit the hottest pepper in the world, and the Scorpion, Ghost Pepper, and Habanero are nothing to laugh at either. Use with caution!

Cuisinart Immersion Blender: $31.95

Anyone who makes smoothies, milkshakes, pesto, hummus, soups, beverages, and/or sauces could use an immersion blender! I’ve used this guy in my own kitchen to create the perfect smoothness in my tomato basil soup, vegan dark chocolate peppermint hot cocoa, black bean soupgreen tea matcha latte, and to mix up my breakfast coffee protein shakes (sans banana). It is WAY easier to clean than a full blender when you have a small job to do.

Spices of the World Gift Set: $34.95

This is the Budget Epicurean, and what could be more epicurious than trying a new spice blend from an exotic cuisine? This World Spice set of 16 different mixes contains the flavors of Ethiopia, India, Africa, South America, and more. With everything from Za’atar and Tikka Masala to Chinese Five Spice and Harissa, these spices will entertain in the kitchen for months to come.

Price Range: $36 & Up

Cuisinart Electric Wine Bottle Opener with Vacuum Sealer: $37.22

This electric opener and sealer makes a nice glass of red easy breezy. With the touch of a button, pop that cork and get your relaxation on. Then don’t worry about having to finish the whole bottle, because it also has a vacuum sealer to keep unused wine fresh for days.

Home Brew Ohio 1 Gallon Wine Making Kit: $38.42

This is the kit that got us started on our home-brewing adventures! We have made 2 gallons of grape wine so far, and are working on our first gallon of mead now. This kit has everything you need to get started except the juice. Buy it as frozen concentrate or as 100% juice in any flavor you want to try. The carboy, airlock, bucket, and tubing can be reused over and over. If they like wine making, it will only cost a few dollars in upkeep to replace the other ingredients, and keep the homemade wine flowing.

NeoMega Avocado Oil Super Pack 4 Flavors: $39.99

We all know that avocados are the darlings of the millennial food scene, but there are many scientifically proven benefits to avocado oil, like reducing cholesterol, it contains leutein (important for eye health) and oleic acid, a healthy fat, and it may help gum disease and promote wound healing.

Neomega Nutritionals was started in 2016 by local Durham NC mom of three. After leaving the world of clinical research, she decided to pursue her passion for clean eating and healthy pantry options. With flavors like Ginger Turmeric Orange, Chili Pepper, Roasted Garlic, Rosemary, and Basil, this oil is perfect for all your soup-finishing, fish or chicken-drizzling, salad-dressing needs.

Sunbeam Stand Mixer With Dough Hooks & Beaters: $59.99

A stand mixer is SO GREAT if you make any amount of dough based items. I use my stand for my homemade pretzels, pizza dough, and plain and ciabatta bread. It’s also awesome for holiday cookies. This is basically a newer version of the old one my grandmother gifted to me about 7 years ago, and mine is still goin’ strong. No need to spend hundreds on a fancy gadget with a dozen attachments when a whisk and a dough hook does the trick for just about anything.

Ninja Professional Blender 1000: $75.99

If you have a gift exchange with a $100 limit, or a recipient you really like, consider giving them the gift of fresh smoothies, soups, and milk shakes on demand. This is the exact blender I asked for about 2 years ago, and it is still going strong. After endless peanut butter banana smoothies, blender pesto, blender hummus, smoothies, and more, the Ninja keeps performing day after day. With 1000 watts of power, it crushes ice like a champ and blends to perfection, and the best part is that it is all dishwasher safe!

Authentic Italian White Truffles 1 oz: $270

If you want to prove your love to someone, or show off your ridiculous wealth, consider supporting the Italian economy while making someone’s pasta taste weird and earthy. Just kidding, if you are this wealthy, please email me immediately so we can be friends*.

 

 

There you have it, my epicurious friends, a personally curated list of the Budget Epicurean top gift picks. Hopefully someone on your list will love these things, and you will make someone else’s table a little brighter this holiday season.

Xoxo,
BE

 

*Meant in the spirit of jest and sarcasm. Obviously, this is also a perfectly legitimate gift option if this is your price range. However, you are likely on the wrong blog…

My Top 10 Money Saving Strategies

If you read enough personal finance and frugality articles, you will see a definite theme. Spend Less. Save More. (Next level? Pay off debt, start investing).

There are thousands of ways to save tiny amounts of money by shopping less and shopping strategically, making and doing things yourself, and getting creative. You can also really slash your money needs if you focus on reigning in your biggest expenses: housing, transportation, and food.

I can’t really talk about saving money on housing (can I say how good it feels to finally own a house and NOT be paying someone else’s mortgage?), but I can tell you about my transportation tips, and as the Budget Epicurean I hope I know a thing or two about saving money on food! Food spending is in fact one of the lowest hanging fruits when first looking to trim the budget, as I will show you below.

Over the past decade or so, I have read and learned a LOT, and built upon my semi-frugal upbringing. We had leftover nights and no exotic weeks long overseas vacations, but we also ate out on occasion and never had to scrimp for new school clothes. I’ve tried out several hundreds of frugal strategies and tips, and kept the ones that work for me. You should do exactly the same!

All advice does not work for all people. Some people have a one-person household in a small apartment to care for, while others may have multiple children and pets, a blended or extended family, or you may be elderly and living alone without a next generation to be concerned about. Take this advice with a grain of salt, and look at it through the lens of your own situation. I hope you find it helpful!

And now, on to my top ten money-saving tips:

1. Meal Planning

In my 2014 article about meal planning, I explained how simple it can truly be to plan your meals, and not much has changed over the years. Sure, now I write mine out on a fancy whiteboard, but that’s just because I got tired of wasting so much paper!

Creating a meal plan each week (or each month, if you’re really ambitious!) is a top ten frugal strategy because it keeps your grocery bill low in many ways.

You can plan meals around what is on sale this week, lowering your total at the cash register. You can take stock of your pantry and freezer, using up food items you’ve already paid for. And you can plan for batch cooking and using leftovers, keeping you from throwing hard-earned money right into the trash because you forgot to eat it before it spoiled.

Start slowly. Maybe just write a list of things you know how to cook or enjoy cooking, and make one of those meals this week, plus a little extra, and freeze it. Then write in that leftover meal for one night next week.

Try to creatively use ingredients in multiple meals in one week, like my multiple uses for a pork roast, or a cook a whole chicken and use the meat all week. Plain cooked grains (rice, quinoa, couscous, barley) or cooked beans can be mixed and matched endlessly, and they also freeze well for later.

A word of caution: don’t try to become someone you’re not.

Make sure to add in meals you know you and your family will like, and write in “dinner out” or “order pizza” or “leftover buffet” occasionally to keep your plan in line with your lifestyle. If you eat a “flexitarian” diet now with occasional meat, you may have a riot on your hands if you try to plan vegetarian only meals for a month. Similarly if no one likes soup and you make ten gallons, the odds of food waste are high, and that’s what we are trying to avoid!

2. Cooking at Home

To go along with tip #1 to plan your meals, also try to cook at home as much as possible. When you order food outside the house or go to a restaurant, you are paying for the food in addition to the time for someone else to make it, package it, and clean up after it. You are paying for the convenience. You may also be paying taxes and tip on top of all that.

When you make your food at home, you pay for the food.

Cooking is a skill, and it is one that must be learned and practiced over time. If you have never so much as scrambled an egg, don’t panic. Just start small, have fun with it, and accept that every meal doesn’t have to be a four-course five-star success.

Breakfast is a simple meal to start cooking at home. Try make-ahead egg muffins, breakfast burritos, orange-cranberry muffins, or make your own granola or granola bars. Then work your way up to making lunches like tuna salad, grilled cheese, salmon-couscous salad, or a big batch of chili or minestrone soup.

Pack your own snacks, like hard boiled eggs, peanut butter and apples, turkey cheese roll-ups, or trail mix. Before you know it, you won’t even have to think about it, and will be cooking up whole food healthy meals for pennies on the dollar.

This goes for drinks too!

Soda, teas, fruit juice, energy drinks, and sports drinks are not only sugar and calorie bombs, but come at a premium price outside the house. If you must have your Gatorade or Diet Coke, at least save yourself several hundred dollars over the years by buying a 12-pack at the store and bringing it from home rather than paying $2 per day at a vending machine.

3. Eating Leftovers

When I got to college, and even more so when I moved off campus to an apartment, one of the biggest surprises for me wasn’t how much laundry I can produce in one month, how little sleep I can function with, or even how often people fall asleep in lecture halls.

It was how many people hate leftovers.

I met so many people who wouldn’t even take leftovers home from a restaurant meal, or would put boxes in the fridge to be ignored and then eventually thrown out weeks later.

You are literally throwing your money in the trash! I wanted to yell.

When you buy a meal out and eat half of it, then bring the other half home, that is like $5 of the $10 total sitting in your refrigerator. If you eat that meal, you’ve now had two $5 meals. If you throw it away, you have had one $10 meal, wasted perfectly edible food, and contributed to our growing food shortage crisis and landfills.

Why??

I grew up with the concept of a leftover buffet almost every week. On a busy weeknight, mom would just pull out all the containers in the refrigerator, spread them out on the kitchen table, and we got to pick and choose and put together a meal. Sure, maybe it was meatloaf and stir-fried rice and a bowl of wedding soup, but it was an already-made meal that we were not going to waste.

Weekly Eating 8/7/17

In my series “weekly eating” I try to showcase how I use leftovers creatively to become new meals, and even plan for it on purpose. This enables me to buy in bulk and on sale, to use freezer meal cooking, and to make “free meals” where I use scraps that could be tossed and instead turn them into soup or casserole or stir fry.

All these tactics together can save you thousands of dollars!

So suck it up, buttercup, and have the other half of that chicken pesto panini or leftover Pad Thai for lunch today. Is it as good as it was fresh? Probably not. Is it cheap and a hell of a lot better than ramen or cereal? Probably yes. You may find it tastes even better after sitting overnight.

4. Buy & Try Generics

So you’re at the store, auto-piloting through your grocery list, with some other household items in mind as well. You cruise up and down the aisles, grabbing your Tostitos chips and Pace salsa, Oreos as a treat, a refill on Bounce dryer sheets, and some Dawn. A case of Diet Coke and a box of Frosted Flakes get thrown in the cart too.

If you grew up eating, drinking, or using a certain brand, you may have an emotional attachment to it. You truly believe that brand of product is the best one at what it does. Or you’ve seen enough commercials for it you can quote them word for word. Or there is one type of snack that you just have to have in the house at all times.

What you don’t realize is how those nickles, dimes, and dollars are bleeding your bank account dry year after year.

The difference between a name-brand product and a similar (or nearly exact) generic or “store brand” item may be just a few cents, or it may be $5. The point is, it all adds up over time. For example, if you just tried one new item in the generic form rather than the name brand each week, you could save yourself maybe $4 per month.

The items that you find taste or work the exact same way as the brand you like? Keep using them! Automatic savings. The ones where there is a noticeable difference in taste or outcome? Switch back! It really is that simple.

In my house, we will only use Dawn dish soap for greasy pots and pans, because I really think it works better, faster, and more completely than other store brand soaps I’ve tried. I save the dollar store soap for washing the car or the floor.

But when it comes to paper towels, I have yet to find a $3 per roll brand that can’t do the same job as a $0.50 roll of “Thrifty”, or whatever is on sale. I also can’t tell the difference between $1/jar Kroger brand pasta sauce and $3/jar Bertolli. The line of where it becomes worth it is different for everyone, but you owe it to yourself and your bank account to find that line.

5. In-sourcing

As a semi-famous mustachioed genius once said, “Muscle over Motor” is a great way to save money.

By that I mean, do physical chores with the type of tools your grandparents would have used rather than buying a gas- or electric-powered version to do it faster (and more expensively). Use a rake to rake leaves rather than a leaf blower. Shovel show with an actual shovel. Mop the floors with a mop, or even better, a washcloth and a bucket of hot soapy water.

Household tasks like lawn care, landscaping, gardening, pet maintenance, personal grooming, cooking, and cleaning, are all things that we have varying degrees of love, hate, or tolerance for. And we could easily fork over a few hours’ of our labor in the form of cash to outsource these tasks to someone else.

Or, you could learn and practice useful life skills, and keep your money for yourself!

For example, we bought a $20 electric razor kit, and now my husband never has to go pay for a haircut the rest of his life. I trim my own hair between (every other year) cuts too. We mow our own lawn, rake our never-ending leaves, clean our gutters, snake our own drains, fill the cars’ wiper fluid and check oil levels, change our own wiper blades, trim our own trees, bathe and anti-tick and clip the dogs’ nails and fur, and more.

These small tasks may be annoying, or tedious, or an interruption to an otherwise Netflix-and-video-games filled weekend. They may also be a little scary because you’ve never done it before. That’s what YouTube, or your dad or neighbor are for.

The time spent insourcing our own tasks is time well spent because we did not have to pay someone with time spent at our day jobs to get it done. Many small, regular preventive maintenance tasks also keep your home/appliances/car/self running better longer, keeping you from having to pay for a more  expensive repair or replacement later down the road.

6. Frugal Hobbies

We all have the same number of hours and minutes in each day. And we all get to choose how we spend those hours and minutes.

A few of these hours have required items, they are spoken for. We must eat, and we must sleep. That is basically it. We do need to house and clothe ourselves, we almost all have relationships we participate in, and we must find ways to pay for our necessary expenses (if you don’t already have passive income taking care of that for you). How we do these things is up to us.  We also get large sections of “Free Time” which is not yet spoken for.

Even if you have an expensive commute, eat all organic and expensive foods, have a large family, and wear the nicest name-brand work clothes, you can still cut corners in your personal time.

There are many “toys”, sources of entertainment, hobbies, and past times that are just huge money-sucks.

For example: boats, jet skis, skiing, golfing, shopping, having to play the newest video games, frequent movie-going, concerts, or nightly partying at the bars downtown. It is so easy to blow $50 on one night of drinking and dancing, or $500 on a weekend at the lake, or $5000 on a ski trip to Breckenridge twice per season.

I definitely think it is important to be social, to find like-minded friends and nurture those relationships. But you don’t have to blow your whole paycheck every weekend to do so!

By cultivating frugal hobbies, you can entertain yourself and possibly others, while doing small or no damage to your bank account and future financial goals. There are plenty of hobbies which may even further enrich you!

Some ideas might include: bird watching, baking, board games or card games, reading books, drawing, knitting, dog walking, nature hikes, blogging, cycling, or geocaching.

These types of hobbies and entertainment can provide the same kinds of enjoyment and escape from the mundane and from work or home life, but without causing you to have to work more to support paying for them.

Use your ‘free time’ to free yourself from having to trade your time for dollars.

7. Ignoring “the Joneses”

As you cultivate these new frugal hobbies and pastimes, and begin cooking at home more and cutting your own lawn, you may feel some judgment from those around you. Your friends, neighbors, coworkers, or even your family may discourage your new habits.

Ignore them.

How you live your life only impacts you and your immediate family. If your neighbor buys  a new Bentley, you don’t feel the weight of that car loan, he does. And if your aunt tells stories about her latest and greatest European vacation, you can enjoy the photos but not the credit card bill that comes due every month.

In the same way, if you are making good choices like cooking at home twice a week and taking your lunch to work, your coworkers might miss you at Chilis but you won’t miss that missing $50 every week. Instead you can transfer it into your savings account, pay down your student loans or mortgage faster, or buy some stocks.

And the best part is, as you are ignoring those who choose to be spendier than you, you will also be putting yourself in good places and a good mindset to start meeting people with similar goals and lifestyles. Maybe your neighbor asks to borrow your ladder rather than buy one too, or your coworker starts chatting with you about that delicious looking chicken salad sandwich you brought, and you discover a mutual love of Go Fish. You never know.

8. Driving an Older, Paid-off Vehicle

I wish I could also say that I save money by having a small commute or being able to walk or bike, but I did make a bit of a commuting mistake, as I wrote about here. If you are able to telecommute (work from home), or live close enough to your place of business to walk and/or bike or take public transit, I highly recommend that.

However, if as I do, you have a long commute every day, you can still make frugal choices to slash the amount of stress that commute puts on your yearly and life-long cash-flow.

In 2017, we have set a new record: the average new car loan has topped $30,000 for the first time ever. A record 17 million Americans have a car loan, and we are taking out bigger and bigger amounts to be paid back over longer and longer periods of time.

Average loan: $30,032
Average monthly payment: $503
Average payback length: 68 months

That is FIVE AND 2/3 YEARS. To pay off a car, that you will be tired of after three, and continue driving for what, maybe 8?

Rather than take on that crazy payment for a depreciating item, why not save up over time. Keep your crap car, or walk, and pay yourself what you would have taken out for a car loan, by putting it aside in a savings account. Then, after 2 or 3 or 5 years, you have a few grand saved up and can buy an older used car outright!

Of course, this in itself is a balancing act.

All cars, no matter how well built or maintained, do have a finite lifespan. Unless you have access to new parts and a ton of machine know-how, there comes a time when maintaining an older vehicle is more costly than replacing it.

If your beater car is worth $500, starts making weird noises and/or shaking weirdly and you find out there is a minimum $3000 you have to put in to get it running again, I’d say cut your losses and start looking for your next ride.

9. Recycling, Creative Re-Purposing, & DIY

My grandma used to have a phrase that I assume was learned from living through the Great Depression:

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without”*

I LOVE that saying. Because it strikes at the heart of much of what frugality is. (It does kind of tap dance on the line between frugal and cheap, but that’s a whole other discussion). One of the greatest destroyers of wealth is shopping, plain and simple.

We live in such a throw-away culture, where devices are purposefully built to last only a few years or less, people are wasting up to 40% of all the food that enters the house (see the leftovers rant above), and if something gets a scratch or even slightly malfunctions we simply chuck it in the bin and buy a new one to have delivered in two days.

Wasting and re-buying these things, or even buying in the first place, is also chucking your hard-earned cash money in the trash bin.

Why not try to imagine a creative way to turn something you no longer like/use/works into something else? Maybe someone else  has a vase you can borrow (or keep) rather than buy a new one with each bouquet, you can turn wooden pallets into all kinds of creative decor and projects, a broken picture frame plus wire can become an earring holder, a burnt out lightbulb can become an oil lamp, there are literally infinite ideas online.

Sometimes all you need is a new perspective, a fresh coat of paint, and a free afternoon to create something functional, interesting, beautiful, or useful, and also save yourself some serious cash. You might be surprised at all the ways you can turn trash into treasure.

*Qualifier: This isn’t the Depression, of course. There are obviously products you should spend some money on, like good shoes or a set of quality pans. I’m saying be mindful of your purchases and think about the long-term cost per use rather than whip out the credit card just because you like that shade of blue on that pillow.

Quality over quantity, folks.

10. Planning Purchases & Avoiding CC Debt

Ah, delayed gratification. That beautiful, crucial life skill which makes you much more likely to be successful, and yet so many people lack these days.

In the era of exponential technological advances where nearly anything can be learned, watched, bought, or done with the swipe of a finger, the art of waiting is something which we should all try to cultivate.

We have tons of data on past sales and price fluctuations, use that knowledge to plan when is the best time to purchase anything. For example, do you want to remodel your living room? Maybe wait until April for discounts on carpet, and May for cheap paint. Whether you have kids or not, you know August is the time to stock up on cheap school & office supplies. And go figure, November & December are the best times to invest in a new gas grill. When no one is grilling.

Almost all of our purchases can and should be anticipated and planned for. We know how long phones tend to last, we know we will need furniture, lawn equipment, when family and friends’ birthdays are (well… maybe not those of us with horrible memories), the dates of anniversaries and national holidays. There is no excuse to not have a plan for these events.

As for regular, everyday purchases like paper towels, Windex, dish soap, diapers, deodorant… you can keep a running list on the refrigerator, in a Google doc, or on your phone. Then you can order it all at once, or make one large trip, saving yourself the temptation from multiple store runs. Simply avoiding impulse buys ever can save you hundreds, even thousands of dollars each year.

A handy rule I used before I had my iron will fully developed is to wait 7 days per $50. So if there was something I wanted because I saw it in an ad or someone told me about it, I put it on a list.

And then I waited, researched it, and comparison shopped. If, after a week, you still want the item, it is something you legitimately need and or will use regularly, you know which place has it for the best price, and assumedly have read reviews saying it is a worthwhile thing to have, go ahead and purchase it.

If you find yourself hardly remembering what it was you wanted last Tuesday? Not a thing you need in your life.

Before long, this process becomes second nature, and you find your life much less stressed from lack of money, because now you have more, and lack of space to put all your stuff, because there is less stuff!

 

 

What are your best frugal tips? Do you already do any or all of these?

LASIK eye surgery: is it worth it?

 

If you have perfect or near-perfect vision, imagine that one day you wake up and the world is kind of blurry. Within a week, you can see nothing with any clarity farther than 6 inches in front of your face. Now imagine living with that for over a decade. That’s how bad my vision was for most of my life.

Starting around grade school, it became hard to see the blackboard. And then hard to see road signs. And then I could hold my hand out at arms’ length, and my fingers were a blur. Every year I’d go for an eye exam, and they would tell me my vision had gotten worse by a half point or more.

For those of you who also have terrible eyes, I had a +6.5 in my left and a +7.0 in my right eye. For those who don’t have bad vision, just know that I was basically blinder than a bat (which, btw, is a totally inaccurate saying, but what can you do.)

If this were prehistoric times, I would be eaten by a Saber-tooth before you could say “hunter-gatherer”. Thank goodness we live in an era of modern medicine, so that I have the benefits of human technology to keep me alive, functioning, and productive.

Biannual eye exams, vision insurance, super thick glasses lenses, new frames every few years, two packs of contacts per month, a few contact cases and 2-packs of contact solution really adds up, especially when you are a high school student, a super poor college kid, and then a similarly broke graduate student.

I looked into LASIK eye surgery many many times, but kept getting sidetracked by the fact that most reputable places won’t even think about touching your eyes until 24, and the cost. The cost is pretty pricey, but varies widely. Most surgeons charge between $1000 – $2500 per eye, so $2,000 – $5,000 total. Yikes.

While I was a graduate student making only $10,500/year, I didn’t think this was at all possible. However, when I eventually decided to make the hard choice to leave the pursuit of a PhD in exchange for a different career path, I wound up in a job making $14/hr.

Now, this is not a hugely Earth-shattering amount of money, but it was significantly higher than the minimum wage, and enabled me to start saving a larger percentage of my take-home pay each month.

I had already paid down a big chunk from my (admittedly minuscule compared to average) undergraduate loans, and now finally had a 401K to contribute to. This career path was working out great for me, I totally loved it and was secure in the position. My then-boyfriend (now husband) and I lived together, were both quite frugal, and made more than 4x our rent per month combined.

It felt like the time had finally come.

Are you ready for LASIK?

If you are considering undergoing LASIK yourself, there are several things to keep in mind:

  • Are you at least 18 years of age or older? Your eyes continue to grow and change shape until your mid-20s, so you shouldn’t be undergoing a procedure like this until then
  • Can you handle the financial impact? If you are under crushing student loan / car loan / credit card debt, and are paying more than 20% of your income towards such things, maybe wait…
  • Are you squeamish about pain or eye drops? Some people flinch and can’t handle it; if so find a family member/S.O./close friend to help, because at 2am when you’re in pain, you need those drops
  • Has your prescription remained stable for at least 1 year? You don’t want your eyes to change as soon as you get the surgery
  • LASIK is irreversible. You cannot un-laser your eyeballs
  • There are a lot of very serious risks and possible side effects. Not to scare you away, but just know about it and be prepared to deal with these things
  • This will not prevent age-related decline in eyesight. You may still need reading glasses again in your 40s, in fact you likely will. LASIK does not change that, but the younger you are when you do the surgery, the better you recover and the longer it lasts

Even if you think you are 100% ready for this, and cannot wait to throw your contact case or glasses in the trash, make sure you are aware of the risks, and have all your questions answered. Find a qualified physician who performs the procedure, and ask him or her lotttttttts of questions.

If they are good at what they do, they will likely answer many right up front, they will encourage you to ask, and they will answer honestly and thoughtfully, not just pressure you with a sales pitch.

Finding the right Doc:

If you are considering LASIK, you probably already have an optometrist you see regularly. You can ask them, if you like and trust them, for recommendations. Or you can ask around with your friends, coworkers, roommates, or family. You will definitely need at a minimum, a pre-surgical exam for the doctor to get an idea of the baseline status of your eyes.

You are able to go for a second opinion, or really to as many docs as you like, before making your decision. Talk to your insurance too, and see if they will cover anything at all: the pre or post-op exam, the eye drops, special eye coverings or sunglasses, etc. Make sure you understand the total cost, and any payment options available. Ask about the typical recovery time, and any symptoms you may have or that you should be concerned about.

Some sites or doctors will request you stop wearing contact lenses, if you do, for a few weeks’ beforehand, though my eye doctor did not. They told me my eyes were at the border of how bad they could get before nothing more could be done. So I decided to take the plunge.

One day, while living in Colorado, I heard an ad on the radio. Basically one of the nations’ top eye docs had his office right down the road from my office, and was running a holiday special. They were charging about $3000 for both eyes, if you came in for your free consult before the end of the month.

I had to use a special credit card account through a company called Care Credit. This was mandated by the office that did my procedure, I did not have a choice in the matter. Luckily, I had very good credit (always have) and qualified right away. I don’t think their screening was very thorough anyhow.

The terms were set with a planned repayment program, with no interest at all as long as you paid the total by or before the end of 3 years post surgery. Not a problem for me, in fact I paid a little extra a few times, and my very last payment (the only debt carried by myself or fiancee at the time) I timed to be the morning of our wedding day, so we could officially start our marriage debt free!

I signed up for the card, finished the pre-op exam, and scheduled the surgery date. I was so nervous, but also really excited! My mom, who is a registered nurse, volunteered to come out to stay with me for a few days too, to help with the drop administration and recovery part. I’m a lucky girl.  🙂

The procedure & recovery

The doc I used was great about preparing me for the day of surgery. They went over what would happen each step of the way, so I had a reasonable expectation of sensations and timeline.

  1. You get to the office, and they put you in a room. You get numbing eye drops, and then sit back to relax for about 30 minutes while they take effect.
  2. A doc or tech comes to get you, and leads you to the laser room. At this point, everything is super blurry, so I definitely held their arm and trusted they knew what they were doing.
  3. You lay back on the surgery chair/table, and they lower a big device over your face. Starting with one side, they have a clamp to hold your eyelid open. Your eye is numb, so it mostly doesn’t hurt, but the clamp thing puts a lot of pressure on your ocular bones; that part did hurt and gave me a headache 🙁
  4. The world slowly goes black as they laser the lens and peel it back. You also smell burning, which is super freaky. But I was warned, so I was ready for it.
  5. After about 2 minutes, the world becomes bright and blurry again as they replace the lens.
  6. The pressure is removed, and the big machine moves to your other eye and clamps it open.
  7. Repeat the black – burning smell – back to light on the other side.
  8. Pressure is finally gone, you can sit up and leave.
  9. They give you plastic eye guards (so you can’t unthinkingly scratch your eyes and for while you sleep), pain drops and antibiotic drops, and send you on your way home.
  10. You must put in both drops every 4 hours. Trust me, you want the numbing ones. Because about 8 hours after, right before I could put in drops again, my eyes were on FIRE. I wanted to cry because it hurt so much, but that would just make it hurt more.
  11. The pain only lasts about 24 hours, then it kind of goes away to just a dull throb, with a little dryness lingering a week or so. Keep using the drops as long as they tell you to.
  12. You go for a post-surgical checkup exam after about a month.

I KID YOU NOT, the second I sat up from the procedure, I could read the pictures on the walls, and the name tag on the shirt of the nurse helping me from the room. Modern medicine is miraculous.

I was driving the very next day. IT WAS A MIRACLE, forreal.

Other than the worst hour (the hour in the middle of the night right before I was allowed to put the numbing drops in again) there wasn’t very much pain at all. And the dryness went away within a week or so, though I think I wore the (really sexy) eye covers to bed for about a month. You do not want to tear the lens in your sleep!

Since having LASIK done, I have never once regretted it. I no longer have to worry about whether I have enough contact solution or where my glasses are. I can go swimming and not worry about losing a lens, or ride a jet ski, or read late at night, or a myriad of other things you don’t really think about with good vision.

The only lingering side effect? Onions bother me now.

I know some people will say “That’s silly, onions bother everyone”. Not true, as a foodie, I’ve diced my fair share of onions and then some. And they have never made me tear up. But post-LASIK, as soon as knife hits flesh on an onion, here come the waterworks. In terms of trade-off, I’ll take it.

Almost 4 years later, it still hits me once in a while what a miraculous thing eyesight is, and how blessed I am to have 20/20 vision now.

How much did I spend vs save?

Clearly, from a lifestyle perspective, I think LASIK was well worth it.

But, was is a sound financial decision? I ran the numbers, and you can see for yourself. I added up what I would spend in a typical year on glasses and contacts, these numbers may vary based on how good your vision insurance is, where you buy your lenses, what brand/type you use, how often you change them, etc. This is just based on my experiences, in Ohio and Colorado prices.

  • 12 contact lenses = ~$38 per box x 2 eyes = $76 (+tax)
    Year’s supply = $152 (+tax)
  • Contact solution = ~$4 per 3 months x 4 = $16
  • Contact cases = $2 (I’d lose at least one per year)

Yearly cost = approx. $170

LASIK surgery performed at 26 should last me approximately 20-25 years, meaning the cost of not buying contacts (plus about $200 for new glasses roughly every 4 years) would be:

Total over 20 years: ($170 x 20) + 800 = $4200

And if it lasts me even longer, then so much the better! Therefore, at a minimum, if LASiK lasts 20 years and I paid $3000, then I will have saved myself $1200. Along with a lot of headache and annoyance, which is worth even more than that to me.

 

 

Have you had or are considering LASIK? Do you think it’s worth the risks/worth it financially?

Hosting a Cookie Swap Party

Disclaimer: Some of the links take you to a product, which if you buy, will give this blog a tiny commission, so I can eat more cookies. Thanks!

 

With the winter holidays just around the corner, you may be feeling stressed already, sad and anxious, dreading travel and spending time with crazy aunt Millie… or you might be filled with the holly jollies, stringing lights everywhere, humming Christmas tunes to yourself, and dreaming of all the seasonal things you plan to do.

Hopefully, you have several things to look forward to this holiday season. Regardless of if you celebrate Christmas, Hanukkah, Quanzaa, the Winter Solstice, or anything else, the winter holiday season is always a season of joy, love, tradition, and generosity. And food. Lots and lots of food. Especially desserts.

If you don’t have holiday traditions already in your own family or friends group, might I recommend starting one?

There are a million and one ways to enjoy the winter, regardless of what you believe, what the weather is like, and where you live. But one of my all-time favorite traditions that I hope to start myself in my new home state is a Cookie Swap.

There are basically two ways to do a Cookie Swap.

  1. Everyone brings already-made cookies, in an agreed-upon amount, and each person goes home with some number of each kind of cookie
  2. Everyone brings a recipe and ingredients, and then you bake them all together; each person still goes home with some number of each kind of cookie

Obviously, the kind of party you could or should host depends upon who has the facilities. If you are all in college or graduate school or tiny one bedroom apartments, then baking six dozen of five kinds of cookies might be a stretch. But if you have a decent sized kitchen with lots of counter space, I’d recommend that route!

A cookie swap is an awesome holiday tradition for several reasons.

Saves Time

If your family is at all like mine, you used to spend a LOT of time making cookies. Like, weeks upon end of flour, butter, sugar, mix it all together. Add the eggs, add the milk. Roll, make sure they are all the same size, dust with flour, roll some more, preheat to 350. Set the timer, whip the filling, thaw the dough, chill the icing.

The time it takes to make each kind of cookie is quite nearly inversely related to how delicious it is. Sure, there are some exceptions (really outstanding sugar cookies? sure) but that’s pretty much how it goes. You know that those cookies only Nana knows the full recipe for and take 18 hours in total are damn delicious.

My very scientifically accurate cookie vs time graph

So imagine you wanted to have all those tasty cookies, which on your own would take about 96 hours of work to create. But then you get to have them all, after only one day. Magic and sorcery you say?

Nay. Only the magic of teamwork.

Saves Money

In a similar way that you can use the magic of scale to save yourself time making lots of kinds of cookies in one go, you can also use the magic of economy by purchasing ingredients in bulk. You can probably find a cheaper price per pound on sugar if you know you will need 30 pounds of it versus 3.

You can agree to buy all ingredients at once and then split it all ways, or assign specific ingredients to certain people. It helps to have at least one very organized person in the group to organize the little details like this.

It is also very likely that you will save money versus buying holiday cookies at the store. Sure, if you buy generic crap off the day-old bakery shelves, you definitely will find better deals. But for a homemade, unique, made with love dozen cookies? Those things sell for easily $5-$20 per dozen, depending on the intricacy of recipe.

Recipes to try:

Bonding

Along with saving money on the actual cookies themselves, you are saving yourself some money by enjoying some frugal entertainment. Instead of going out to a movie and spending $15 on tickets plus $10 on concessions, a happy hour with $8 drinks, or dinner and maxing out your credit card, you can make new friends, and get closer to friends you already have in the comfort of someone’s home for almost free.

You can start many more traditions inside this tradition as well. Maybe make up your own words for traditional Christmas songs. Or have a theme, like a type of nut, a color, or “frosted” each year. One of the best ideas I’ve seen is to have everyone write down their recipe in a journal. Then each person gets to take home a copy, that will have all the cookie recipes each year.

Imagine a few decades from now, passing those books on to family or loved ones, and telling stories of holidays past. That time you spilled the flour all over the floor, the time your friend set off the smoke alarm because she got drunk and forgot to set the timer, or that time your cute neighbor came over to crash the party because it smelled so good.

If you think this sounds great, then now is your moment! Here is how to set up your very own cookie swap:

  1. Decide if you want everyone to bake at home, then just bring cookies and hang out, or if you will all bake together.
  2. Determine who would be interested in coming, and from there who could host the party and when.
  3. Invite a group of about three to seven people. That would be enough variety but not overwhelm most kitchens.
  4. Choose your cookie recipes. It could be a family recipe handed down for generations, or a new one you’ve always wanted to try. I wouldn’t recommend going too crazy your first year, unless you are already a pretty accomplished baker.
  5. Compile all the recipes and figure out your shopping list. Obtain all the ingredients. (And maybe a gallon or two of eggnog, wine, or whatever holiday beverage tickles your fancy)
  6. Show up! Make sure to have plenty of baking sheets, cooking spray, tin foil, wax paper, hand towels, a mixer, whether a hand mixer or standing like a KitchenAid, and plastic ware or tins for everyone to take home their bounty.

That’s all there is to it! If you are the host, be considerate of guests with little touches like holiday music, holiday scents, and having plenty of drinks and snacking foods. If you are attending, be considerate of your host and make sure you help clean up afterwards! Cookie baking does turn your kitchen into a flour-and-egg warzone.

I was lucky enough to be able to attend a friends’ family cookie swap, and it was SO MUCH FUN! We drank wine, mixed, tasted, and talked about life. Grandma shared her wisdom, Grandpa was shocked that I could do shots of whiskey with him, we told stories and laughed a lot. I got to go home with a box full of 7 different kinds of cookies, but more importantly a bunch of fond memories, and the anticipation of doing it again next year!

 

Do you have any fun holiday traditions? Have you ever hosted or attended a cookie swap?

Why a $1000 Raise Didn’t Change My Life

 

If you’ve been reading this blog for any amount of time, it’s not a secret that we are now located in the state of North Carolina. It’s been my dream for almost a decade to live in the Research Triangle, and we finally achieved it! I feel blessed every day to be literally living my dreams.

I also happen to have a full time job working for the state of NC. This comes with some lovely benefits like extra paid holidays, pretty decent healthcare coverage, and state-mandated raises. Now, this could be a double edged sword.

As things on the financial playing field of America are in constant flux, and state and federal budgets keeps seeing more and more cuts, the state has the power to enact hiring freezes, salary freezes, or downsize however is needed to balance the budgets. And NC does not have the best history of worker treatment.

However, the good news is, the current Gov. Pat McCrory is supportive of state workers, and knows that to attract and retain good employees state positions must become and remain competitive with the private sector.

In order to keep up with inflation and keep workers happy, NC employees across the board got a small raise in June 2017. For me personally, this meant an extra $1000/year. Hooray!

What would you do with $1000 extra dollars?

For some people, that could be a literally life-changing amount of money. That could get a family of 4 a few months of groceries, or buy all the necessities for a new baby. That could help pay down medical, credit card, or student loan debt. That might be an extra month’s rent payment that you don’t have to worry about. For a lot of people, living at-near-below poverty level, $1000 is a big deal.

Or, you might start planning an epic weekend getaway to a beach to beat the winter blues. That adds up to a whole lot of eggnog and whiskey, or a year’s worth of fancy dinner dates once a month. Some people would scoff at $1000, thinking that is barely enough to make a dent in loan payoff, or their yearly spending totals.

Would you go on a shopping spree? Get some new boots for winter? Or, you know, the holidays are coming, how about getting extra twinkle lights, some cute Santa blow-ups for the front yard, and maybe a couple extra-nice gifts.

You could just let lifestyle inflation creep in, and $1000 higher yearly spending becomes the new baseline. Maybe move into a bigger apartment with more amenities, buy more house than you should, lease a fancier car, and go out shopping every weekend.

But What Did I Do With the $1000?

I did something very boring. Something Americans in general are really bad at doing.

I invested it.

Yup, without even letting it register in my checking account, I funneled that ‘extra’ money right into a target retirement date investment account.

Now, we could argue all day about different types of accounts, tax advantages, Roth vs IRA vs 401K, fees and mutual funds and bonds and stocks etc etc ad nauseum. I am by no means a sophisticated investor. I barely have a clue about the world of finance and shares and dividends. Reading articles about why rebalancing your own portfolio is easy just make me feel sad and defeated.

What I do know?

Having some money invested is definitely better than none over the long term. Will I lose some possible gains to fees over time by using a robo-advisor? Probably. Could I personally do better by choosing my own allocations and rebalancing yearly or quarterly? No way, because I know myself and I just. won’t. do it.

The Moral of the Story

Automate.

Avoid Lifestyle Inflation.

And Know Thyself.

I love automation. I am probably the most forgetful person I know by a long shot. If it isn’t written down, on the calendar, in my phone with at least three alarms set, if probably isn’t getting done. I’ve forgotten my mom’s birthday, both my siblings’ birthdays, the dog’s vet appointments, and more passwords than there are stars in the sky.

To set myself up for success rather than financial crash-and-burn, I automate everything I possibly can. Mortgage. Water bill. Internet. Savings account transfers. Credit card payments. Investments. All set up with a few clicks of a button, and then I don’t have to think about it ever again. Well, okay maybe like once a year or so I make sure it’s still working. But that’s it.

Not giving into lifestyle inflation is really hard. Trust me, I know. I took WAY longer to pay off student loans than I should have, and delayed our now-future-FIRE plans because I chose to take several cruises during grad school, and dropped another 3 grand on LASIK eye surgery (ok that one was actually 100% worth it).

When you’ve spent several years living in dorm rooms, literal garages and attics, eating ramen and tuna noodle casserole, you desperately want to feel like you’ve “made it” as an adult. You want your own space, your own bathroom, a nicer car, you need “business casual attire” for your big kid job, and on and on.

My husband (then-boyfriend) and I definitely could have stayed in a one bedroom apartment for a few more years rather than upgrade to renting a house for $1300/month, and then $1650/month (CT prices though… that number still hurts my soul).

But those choices were made. That money was spent. And we learned from it.

When we decided to relocate to NC, and were looking to finally buy our first home, we set a very conservative budget range. We knew we did not want to live outside our means. And now we have the peace of mind that comes with knowing that even if one of us lost our job (or chose a mini-retirement?) our monthly expenses would still be covered.

That peace of mind is worth every penny we didn’t spend on a bigger house in a nicer neighborhood, or continuing to drive our fully paid off 2004 and 2005 Honda cars. We hope to stay in this house for a very long time, and pay off the mortgage sooner than 30 years. No matter how many raises we may get.

And that is why being given $1,000 did not change my life.

 

What would you do with $1000?

Accepting the Zero Spend Challenge: October Review

For those of you who do not know what I’m talking about when I say “Zero Spend Challenge” or a Zero Spend Day, please check out the article below from ZeroDayFinance.com first. I’ll wait.

The Zero Day Challenge

Ok welcome back! Hopefully now you know what I’m talking about, and maybe are inspired to try it yourself.

Basically, this challenge turns not spending money into a game.

Everyone loves games! The goal is to rack up as many “Zero Days” as possible, meaning days when you spend zero dollars. This should naturally lower your discretionary spending (things you buy which are wants and not needs) and free up more money to save & invest.

I decided to join in the Zero Day Challenge to see how a typical month’s spending works out. I have a set budget of $75/week on food, other than that most expenses are automated. Mortgage, utility bills, phone payments, etc. all come out of my checking automatically every month, so that I’m never late on a payment.

Hubs and I naturally live a pretty frugal life without much shopping or extraneous expenses. Therefore, I expected that I would have tons of zero spend days! I set a goal of a little over half the month for zero days, and a spending limit of $1200 for myself. This is a little high, but I wanted a good cushion to find my baseline.

Not included in the spending is about $2000 or so towards automated payments and investments, as well as any spending hubs did behind my back. Just kidding, we are both allowed to spend freely as long as we discuss anything over $25 first.  🙂  You could also argue that $218 and change that went towards car insurance shouldn’t be included, but since it was a cashed check and not a credit card autopay I added it in.

As it turned out, I didn’t hit my goal for zero days, but I did come pretty close. I learned that there will always be some spending that pops up that I didn’t plan for.

This month, I had my sister’s birthday sneak up on me, and rather than look like a terrible big sis who didn’t plan ahead (reality) I sent her a Target gift card via text message (because it’s her favorite store of all time and we’re both damn Millennials who are all into text messaging and non-real-money) and looked like a rock-star.

We also had a planned date night (NC Wine Fest for our 1 year anniversary!) this month, and 2 unplanned date nights (a new Ethiopian restaurant opened in downtown, and the NC State Fair). This tells me that maybe I need to start putting a ‘dates’ line item in my monthly budget.

Probably the thing that surprised me the most was the fact that I did not ever go a full week without buying something. For someone who claims to never really shop, that was eye-opening.

Going forward, I think I will keep using the spreadsheet tool (it’s free on ZDF’s website if you subscribe! Go get it for yourself). Seeing how my spending changes month to month and what it averages out to over the course of a year will be really helpful. It is also neat to see how your spending is tracking in line with your goals, and I got sad when the zero day number changed from green to red. I found myself trying to not stop at the store just one more day…

But on the flip side, if I already spent money on something, I felt that if there was anything else ‘needed’ I better hurry up and buy it on the same day. So in that way it could be a slippery slope to spending more. Overall, something that makes you pause before clicking the ‘buy’ button or swiping your card is a good thing in my book.

 

Have you ever tried a zero-spend or ultra frugal month challenge? What did you learn, and do you keep doing it? If you haven’t what’s stopping you?

Weekly Eating – 10/23

Hey y’all! Welcome to the series Weekly Eating.

Here is where I’ll talk about the week’s meal plan versus reality, what we ate for the week, and how we did budget-wise. I hope it gives readers a behind-the-scenes look into our life through the lens of food, and it’s also a way to keep us on track with meal planning and grocery budgeting.

Feel free to share your wins and lessons in the comments below!

 

Monday:

Breakfast – I had a few applesauce muffins still left from making friends with the neighbors, and half a raspberry NOOSA yogurt

Lunch – the rest of a pasta salad I made from last weekend’s Triangle on FIRE Meetup, and a mason jar salad

Dinner – Minestrone Soup. I had this bag in the freezer from my batch freezer meal prep session a long time ago.  I defrosted it overnight, and then tonight just put it in a pot with the broth from the rib bones last week until boiling.

I was a little worried that the noodles would be mushy and gross from being frozen and then thawed, but it actually turned out to be the perfect consistency. This was a really tasty batch, I would use this recipe again.

Snack – I had a little packet of a nut butter sample in my desk drawer, combined with some pretzel crisps I keep as well it made a perfect little afternoon pick me up snack

Tuesday:

Breakfast – applesauce muffins 

Lunch – the last of the Buffalo Chicken Potato Bake leftovers

Dinner – I had a quick burrito before running off to the October Bull City Food Swap. This month’s swap was awesome, there were some really outstanding goodies. Especially the homemade smoked sausage made by my new best friend!  😉

I had brought several items for trade, including some marigold seeds from my yard, hickory nuts (we have 3 trees, and more nuts than we know what to do with) and some homemade garlic rosemary bread. The bread was a hit, as baked goods usually are. I think I found my niche, as you can trade for really good items with homemade bread.

I got lots of caramel corn, jerky, baked goods, fresh pasta, and some pesto. Luckily, pesto was already on the menu for tomorrow! I had also taken out a giant pack of chicken quarters I got on crazy clearance a few weeks ago.

It was $4.44 for 6 leg quarters! That is a lot of chicken for less than a buck a piece. I roasted them up on a sheet pan to keep in the fridge for the boy to snack on whenever he’s hungry this week.

Snack – blender hummus and veggies

Wednesday:

Breakfast – peanut butter granola bar

Lunch – leftover minestrone soup

Dinner – Pesto pasta, using up the fresh pasta from the Food Swap and the rest of some frozen blender pesto I’d made when the basil was done for the season. So garlicy and delicious!

Snack – a mini snicker bar at work

Thursday:

Breakfast – egg sandwich with 2 slices of my garlic rosemary bread

Lunch – a chicken quarter with some brown rice and edamame

Dinner – Beef roast in the slow cooker. I just chopped up some carrots, celery, and potatoes and tossed them in with a beef roast from the freezer. I paid about $10 for a ~3 lb roast, which is not bad

Luckily I have a programmable slow cooker, so I could set it on high for 4 hours, and then it automatically switches to “keep warm” setting so it doesn’t burn. It was a perfect meal for a chilly fall evening. I love that it is just starting to turn kind-of-cold now.

Friday:

Breakfast – I bought a pack of white corn tortillas with the idea to make quick breakfast burritos this week. They were delicious, but the tortillas fall apart and are way too flaky to eat in a car. Flour tortillas from now on.

Lunch – Beet and Goat Cheese Salad with a coworker. I did spend about $7, but this is my first lunch out all month, and the salad was really delicious. No regrets.

Dinner – Burritos, because there is never a bad day for a burrito.

Snack – chocolate peanut butter granola bar

The Weekend

This weekend is pretty exciting, we have a housewarming for a neighbor on Friday and will take a bottle of red wine over to say welcome to the ‘hood. They are about our age, so I’m hoping for a future friendship there. We got invited because I am the only one who has come to say hi since they moved in! It pays to be friendly.

Saturday is the NC Wine Festival in Raleigh! There will be 36 wineries, all from North Carolina, and all tasting is included. There will be food places too I believe, but you probably have to pay. We plan to have a big lunch, and hydrate well prior to going. The tickets were my 1-year ‘paper anniversary’ gift.  🙂

And then Sunday will be recovery and chores. Sleeping in, raking leaves, doing dishes and laundry. You know, all the fun adulting things you have to do. But probably a healthy dose of video games thrown in too.

Food Total: $63.85

This week I am quite pleased with groceries, especially since I was going for super healthy and lots of produce. Most people see winter as the time to gain a little “insulation”, but since we have plans for the holidays which may involve a swimsuit, I’m actually cracking down on my diet, meaning even more produce than normal, and hopefully lower volumes of carbs and dairy. We will see how the next few months go.

I did find some great deals, for example grass fed free range bison, which is absurdly expensive, was marked down nearly half off. It is still shockingly expensive to me, but we do love the flavor and so since I was far within my budget I picked it up to have as a treat at some point. Eggs were on super sale, at 79 cents per dozen, so that will likely be my go-to snack this month. And I found marked down crab meat for 0.99, so I’m going to try some new recipes.

Lessons Learned

This week really reinforced the benefits to eating leftovers. Every dollar spent on food is a sunk cost, so not eating leftovers and throwing away food is like throwing dollars in your trash can. I’m so glad hubs and I both don’t mind, and in some cases prefer, leftovers. I even plan many meals to make more than we can eat in one day, so that we have easily reheatable meals and snacks around.

I also am finding that I have way more food than I think we do! Just pulling most of our meals from the freezer this week, has helped tremendously in keeping overall cost down. And those stocked freezers come from picking up things on sale as I see them, then putting them away for future meals. The flexibility of being able to put together a meal from pieces picked up over time is a skill which can be developed by practicing over time. I’d highly encourage it!

 

How about you guys, did you have a great week or a learning week?

Restaurant Review: Rock’n’Roll Sushi

Since it’s been a while since I’ve done a food review, I figured it was about time! I’ve been to several wonderful places now throughout the Triangle, including Durham, Raleigh, and Chapel Hill. Even a few far-flung places like Asheville and Sunset Beach. In case this is your first BE review article, I’ll remind you of the rules.

Food locations will be evaluated based on:

  • Taste: 1 (wet toast) – 10 (your taste buds have died and gone to heaven)
  • Atmosphere: 1 (gas station bathroom) – 10 (best you’ve ever experienced)
  • Value: 1 (not worth it) – 10 (super duper deal)

All opinions are those of the Budget Epicurean.

 

Today’s review is for a new sushi restaurant in Durham: Rockin’Roll Sushi Express! Located in a shopping plaza at 3405 Hillsborough Rd, Suite E, Durham, NC 27705, they are convenient to downtown Durham as well as the rest of the triangle via highway 85 & 147.

Y’all know I love my sushi, whether homemade or with a burger inside, and was a regular at my old favorite sushi place in Connecticut. Hubs and I have been known to take down plates of nearly 100 nigiri before. So now that I’m a Carolina girl, I had to find an AYCE place to satisfy my insatiable sushi cravings, without breaking the bank.

For only $10.99 each, this place fits the bill!

Not only is it quite affordable, and all you can eat, it is also free entertainment! The restaurant operates with 2 large conveyor belts on each side of the room, which rotate around several tables and chairs. There are little doors in the glass that the customer opens to pull out the dish they want as it rolls by.

According to the adorably named Get-Offline.com, “The conveyor belt sushi (Kaiten-sushi) is a Japanese fast-food style sushi concept. Initially invented so that sushi chefs could quickly serve customers with fewer servers, the “Kaiten-sushi” has since taken off as a fun and fresh way to dine out.”

The conveyor belt rolls by at a pretty decent clip, not so fast that you can’t grab the things that catch your eye but fast enough that by the time you polish off your third roll the thing you wanted seconds of is coming back around.

They have a good assortment of your standard expected rolls like California, Philly, Tuna and Spicy Tuna. They also have some pretty creative specialty rolls, like the Crazy Monkey Roll with fried bananas, or my favorites, the Naughty Crab and Volcano Roll.

Seriously, the Volcano Roll is deep fried goodness. I’d recommend you eat your fill first, because this bad boy takes up a lot of stomach space. They also have plenty of vegetarian and vegan options, including a cucumber roll, avocado roll, and seaweed salad roll.

Obviously, as an all you can eat place, you cannot expect the most amazing delicacies of all time. You get what you pay for, folks, and this is pretty typical American style sushi. Though I must say, the nigiri slices are generous for the fact that you can have as many as you can handle.

If you’re like me and enjoy a light bowl of miso soup before digging in or in between courses, you’re in luck! There is a miso soup dispenser. Yup, you just put your styrofoam bowl underneath and press the button, and a stream of piping hot miso comes pouring out.

The down side is you cannot choose your volume, every pour is the same amount. But they do offer traditional toppings of tofu pieces and chopped green onion. Not to mention literal gallons of soy sauce, yum yum sauce, and teriyaki sauce.

There is also a salad and toppings bar that is included. This has goodies like seafood salad (which is apparently some of the best my grandma has ever tasted, and she is a bit of a seafood salad connoisseur so that’s quite a compliment!) regular green salad, edamame, pickled ginger, and seaweed salad.

I personally had at least 2 big helpings of the seaweed salad. Something about that slimy stuff, I just can’t get enough of the salty umami flavor. There are few dessert options, but they do have oranges and a strange cheesecake like thing. It isn’t very powerful, but it is somehow perfect after a belly full of fish, rice, and soy sauce.

I see this as a personal challenge now, every time I go I need to have more plates! The rolls come with 4 or 6 pieces, and the nigiri come as a set of 2. The plate colors don’t matter, because it is all included in the admission price. This makes me more willing to try things I’ve not had before, and I appreciate not losing out because I like the typically pricier raw fish pieces the best.

There is some soft rock and pop mix playing as you eat, and generally all the diners keep to their own tables. The decor is really fun, with bright photos and definitions of common words like unagi and kani salad on the walls. The bathrooms were quite clean, as was the entire restaurant. There is a self-serve trash area to clear the plates and put them in bins for washing. And you can see the sushi chefs behind the bar at the back, making rolls as fast as you can eat them.

Overall, I’d rate Rock’nRolls:

  • Taste: 7
  • Atmosphere: 8
  • Value: 10