Category Archives: Soups

Salsa Chicken Soup

 

Every once in a while, even those who most love cooking are just too tired or out of ideas to cook. That is the perfect time for me to pull out this little gem! I love recipes that are fast & frugal, and this one is both with the added benefit of being healthy as well.

Whether crunched for time, short on creativity, or you didn’t have time to run to the store so what you have on the shelves is what you’ve got for dinner, this recipe is bound to please. Especially if you do not like to cook any time, this recipe is perfect for you.

Simple: just open a few cans, dump into a pot, and dinner is simmering away. If reading isn’t your thing, and you’d rather see just how easy this is, you can check out the YouTube video, or scroll to the bottom of this post.

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Ingredients:

  • 1 can diced tomatoes
  • 1 can corn
  • 2 cans any type of beans (I used balck and red)
  • Optional: 1 can chicken
  • 1 cup salsa
  • 1 gallon water
  • Optional: Chicken bouillon

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Step 1: Open the chicken, beans, & corn, and drain if you’d like. Rinse the beans to get rid of excess sodium. Honestly, I just throw all of it in the pot for flavor.

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Step 2: Pour the water and canned goods into a pot, not draining the diced tomatoes. I usually use diced tomatoes with green chilies because I like the extra spice. You could use regular tomatoes to tone it down, or dice up a jalapeno and throw it in or add hot sauce for even more spice.

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Step 3: Add in the salsa, stir it all around. Bring to a boil, then let simmer for 20-30 minutes.

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This could also be made by throwing all the ingredients into a crock pot on low all day.

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Suggested toppings include shredded cheese, crushed tortilla chips or torn tortillas, and sour cream.

If you choose, you can use cooked shredded chicken breast instead of canned. Or you could leave out the chicken for a hearty vegetarian soup, both ways are delicious.

Amazing Crab & Corn Chowder

 

Since I live on the East Coast now, things like clam chowder are a given. But one day when I had a craving for it and called around, I found out it costs about $20 per quart to order from a restaurant. Of course my frugal self was all “say what?” I knew I could make something just as delicious for far less. Then one night the significant other, when asked what he’d like for dinner, said “something like soup, but thicker, to dip bread in”.

Challenge accepted.

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I went to the pantry, and surprise, have not stocked anything with clams in it yet. A quick google search revealed that corn chowder and potato chowder are both popular options throughout the midwest and east coast. I love incorporating extra veggies into just about everything, so that sounded good.

But I still wanted that coastline-eqsue “fishy” taste. Not the “I hate salmon forever because this is gross” taste, just the salty, reminds you of the ocean flavor. Anyways.

To my delight, I did have some canned crab meat on the shelf!

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Jackpot. Combined with a teeny bit of fish sauce from my favorite Asian market, that should do the trick. A bit of creative dairy and thickening, and this turned out far superior to anything I’ve had in a restaurant. I was quite pleased, and it definitely satisfied the ‘soup-like but thicker’ and dipability requirements.

Ingredients:

  • 1 can crab meat
  • 1 bag frozen corn (or 2 cups fresh)
  • 2 red potatoes, diced finely
  • 2 celery stalks, diced
  • 1 large yellow onion, diced
  • 1 block of cream cheese
  • 2/3 cup milk
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/4 cup fish sauce
  • 3 cups water
  • Salt & pepper to taste
  • Optional: biscuits for dipping, sharp white cheddar cheese to grate on top

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Step 1: In a large pan, add the oil, potatoes, celery & onion. Cover and cook for 5-7 minutes. Give it a good stir, then add in the corn and cook another 10 minutes, until everything is softened.

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Step 2: Add in the water, fish sauce, and milk, adjusting to suit your tastes.

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Step 3: Bring to just a simmer, and add in the cream cheese. Continue to stir as it dissolves.

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Step 4: Taste and add in the crab, black pepper, & salt. Let simmer until it reaches the desired thickness.

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Step  5: If you made/bought biscuits to go along with it, place those in the bottom of a heavy bowl, and cover with a healthy scoop or two of the chowder. You could also use those little oyster crackers.

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This stuff just smells divine, and is actually packed with tons of diced cooked veggies!

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To thicken even more, you could add a few tbsp flour to the veggies after cooking, just before adding in the water and milk.

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And if you don’t have skim milk, you could use any dairy really, half & half, whole milk, sour cream… Or just don’t use dairy &  keep it vegetarian.

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We grated some sharp white NY cheddar on top.

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Absolutely delicious! And far healthier than restaurant versions as long as you control the dairy content.

Amazing Crab & Corn Chowder

Ingredients

  • 1 can crab meat
  • 1 bag frozen corn (or 2 cups fresh)
  • 2 red potatoes, diced finely
  • 2 celery stalks, diced
  • 1 large yellow onion, diced
  • 1 block of cream cheese
  • 2/3 cup milk
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/4 cup fish sauce
  • 3 cups water
  • Salt & pepper to taste
  • Optional: biscuits for dipping, sharp white cheddar cheese to grate on top

Instructions

  1. In a large pan, add the oil, potatoes, celery & onion. Cover and cook for 5-7 minutes. Give it a good stir, then add in the corn and cook another 10 minutes, until everything is softened.
  2. Add in the water, fish sauce, and milk, adjusting to suit your tastes.
  3. Bring to just a simmer, and add in the cream cheese. Continue to stir as it dissolves.
  4. Taste and add in the crab, black pepper, & salt. Let simmer until it reaches the desired thickness.
  5. If you made/bought biscuits to go along with it, place those in the bottom of a heavy bowl, and cover with a healthy scoop or two of the chowder. You could also use those little oyster crackers.
  6. This stuff just smells divine, and is actually packed with tons of diced cooked veggies! To thicken even more, you could add a few tbsp flour to the veggies after cooking, just before adding in the water and milk. And if you don't have skim milk, you could use any dairy really, half & half, whole milk, sour cream... Or just don't use dairy & keep it vegetarian. This is absolutely delicious! And far healthier than restaurant versions as long as you control the dairy content.
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Ham & Barley Soup

 

I don’t know about wherever you were in the world for April 20th, but happy first day of Spring! FINALLY! And… we got snow. About four inches of fluffy, wet snow. Eff you too Connecticut.

So rumor has it some big holiday thing is happening next week. As in, Easter is one week from today. WHO SAID IT COULD BE APRIL? Time needs to calm itself down, have a cup of tea, and stay awhile. Moving and starting new jobs doesn’t help, because you are insanely busy non-stop. Or so it feels like.

And once the weather remembers that it’s Spring now, it will just be crazier. Because I’ve got a window-full of happy sprouts just waiting for fresh tilled Earth! And so many new farmers markets to explore, restaurants to try, and seafood to enjoy!

Whether you celebrate the religious meanings behind Easter or just get excited about peeps and edible bunnies, it is just around the corner. And that means you are likely going to have the typical Easter ham. Even if not, you can take advantage of post-Easter sales and snap one up.

Ham & Barley Soup is a classic “dad recipe”. My dad is the expert, and has been making this for as far back as I can remember. As a kid I didn’t like it very much, but now that my tastes have matured it is one of my absolute favorite cold-weather dishes. Or anytime really. It’s so easy, and so flavorful! It is the perfect use for leftover ham and ham bones, will keep money in your wallet, and fill you up.

Ingredients:

  • Bones from one large ham shank
  • 12 oz pearled barley
  • 4-5 large carrots, cut into coins
  • 2-3 stalks celery, diced
  • 1 1/2 gallons water or stock
  • Optional: bunch fresh kale, torn, extra ham meat
  • Salt & pepper

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Step 1: For this simple dish, the magic is in the time. Simmering the ham bones in the water all day long brings out the depth of flavor. Put the water or stock in a large soup pot with any bones, and simmer for at least 1 hour, up to 12.

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Step 2: Add the carrots, celery, and barley. Simmer for another 30-40 minutes or longer, until everything is softened.

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Step 3: Season to your liking, add extra meat if you have it, or some spinach or kale.

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This soup is deceptively simple but addicting. It makes an awful lot, so be sure you will eat it over several days, are feeding a lot of people, or have some extra freezer space.

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This is the batch I added some kale to once it was cooked. I liked the extra greens, it gave some great color, extra nutrients, and tasted awesome all together. Give it a try, maybe next week!

 

Ham & Barley Soup

Ingredients

  • Bones from one large ham shank
  • 12 oz pearled barley
  • 4-5 large carrots, cut into coins
  • 2-3 stalks celery, diced
  • 1 1/2 gallons water or stock
  • Optional: bunch fresh kale, extra ham meat
  • Salt & pepper

Instructions

  1. For this simple dish, the magic is in the time. Simmering the ham bones in the water all day long brings out the depth of flavor. Put the water or stock in a large pot with any bones, and simmer for at least 1 hour, up to 12.
  2. Add the carrots, celery, and barley. Simmer for another 30-40 minutes or longer, until everything is softened.
  3. Season to your liking, add extra meat if you have it, or some spinach or kale. If using greens, simmer an extra 5-10 minutes to soften them. Serve hot with some fresh bread or biscuits.
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I can’t believe it’s healthy baked potato soup

 

As winter slowly and painfully winds to a close, here is a recipe sure to warm you as you dream of spring. Everyone loves a nice hot baked potato, and even more so when it is in soup form. I love baked potato soup because it is a great use of a cheap yet healthy staple food, and it is so darn tasty.

The problem lies in the cream. Most baked potato soups either at a restaurant or in grandma’s kitchen rely on heavy creams, dairy, and lots of salt. This creates a dish which delights the taste buds, but not so much the waistline. Excess sodium and fats are terrible for heart health as well as overall health.

So how do you get the creamy taste and filling nature of potato soup without the extra day’s worth of calories? Simple, sneak extra fiber in place of the cream to thicken and add layers of flavor. If you must add in some dairy, try using skim or 1% rather than whole milk or cream. But this recipe makes a soup so thick and tasty you may not even notice it isn’t there.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup cooked mashed acorn squash
  • 1 pound potatoes, diced (peeled if desired)
  • 1 cup red lentils (or brown)
  • 2 cups chicken stock
  • 1 tbsp nutritional yeast
  • 2-3 strips bacon (optional)
  • Cheddar cheese & green onion for garnish (optional)

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Step 1: If you haven’t already, cook the acorn squash. Cook the lentils by adding 1 cup to 2 cups water, and simmer for 20-30 minutes. Dice the potatoes and add to a pot of boiling water. Boil for 8-10 minutes, until soft when poked with a fork. Drain.

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Step 2: In a large bowl, combine the potato, cooked lentils and squash. Add the stock, and bring to a boil. Pour into a blender, and blend on high until combined.

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Step 3: Mix in the nutritional yeast, and pour into bowls. If you wish, season with salt & pepper, or add bacon bits, cheddar cheese, and or chives as garnish.

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This soup is super satisfying, and tastes just like a baked potato. No one will suspect you’ve given it a huge boost of fiber and vitamins while simultaneously removing the biggest source of fats. The blended lentils and squash keeps the thick, creamy base of the soup which previously the dairy caused.

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I can’t believe it’s healthy baked potato soup

Ingredients

  • 1 cup cooked mashed acorn squash
  • 1 pound potatoes, diced (peeled if desired)
  • 1 cup red lentils (or brown)
  • 2 cups chicken stock
  • 1 tbsp nutritional yeast
  • 2-3 strips bacon (optional)
  • Cheddar cheese & green onion for garnish (optional)

Instructions

  1. If you haven't already, cook the acorn squash. Cook the lentils by adding 1 cup to 2 cups water, and simmer for 20-30 minutes. Dice the potatoes and add to a pot of boiling water. Boil for 8-10 minutes, until soft when poked with a fork. Drain.
  2. In a large bowl, combine the potato, cooked lentils and squash. Add the stock, and bring to a boil. Pour into a blender, and blend on high until combined.
  3. Mix in the nutritional yeast, and pour into bowls. If you wish, season with salt & pepper, or add bacon bits, cheddar cheese, and or chives as garnish.
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Split Pea, Lentil, & Potato Soup

 

As the weather turns foul and temperatures drop, I find myself craving thick, hearty, hot soups. There is nothing quite so cozy as sitting on the couch in slippers and PJs with a steaming bowl of goodness while the wind blows, and perhaps the snow falls.

One of my all-time favorite soup bases is the humble potato. Potatoes are so delicious and go well with just about anything, with no super-strong flavor of their own. I’ve previously shared my addictive Loaded Baked Potato Soup and copycat Zuppa Toscana recipes, both of which are sure to please.

One night, with three baked potatoes in my refrigerator and a small bag of split peas in the pantry I’d picked up on a whim, I decided to make the ultimate cold weather comfort soup.

I didn’t want just split pea soup, mostly because I didn’t have a lot of them and I also didn’t have a ham bone. All the recipes say use a ham bone.

So potatoes were the chosen base. I put on a pot of water, and threw them in first. Then I dumped my little bag of peas in, and it still seemed to need something. One more thing.

I looked over on my counter, where I keep several jars (just like these square glass stackable jars) of bulk ingredients that I buy whenever I’m at sprouts and feel adventurous. I especially love pretty colored things. And there it was, the perfect missing ingredient.

Orange Lentils.

You can of course use brown or green lentils as well. With some kale from the fridge and other spices, this turned into a thick, hearty, dreamy soup.

And as a bonus, it is accidentally vegan! But trust me when I say it is so completely delicious. You may crave it all winter long. You’ve been warned.

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Ingredients:

  • 3 small baked potatoes
  • 2/3 cup green split peas
  • 1/2 cup lentils
  • 1/2 cup torn kale
  • 1 tbsp dried onion
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 1 tbsp garlic salt

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Step 1: In a sauce pot, throw in diced baked potato, peas, and lentils. Cover with water, plus about 1 inch. If your potatoes aren’t cooked yet, boil those for 15 minutes before adding the other legumes.

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Step 2: After boiling about 10-15 minutes, add in the kale and seasonings. Stir well, and continue to simmer another 10 minutes or so. The longer you simmer the soup, the more the ingredients will fall apart.

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If you don’t like chunks, you can certainly use an immersion blender or a regular blender in batches to create a puree. But I liked the slightly chunky potato and the still-detectable little peas and lentils.

This soup is so incredible, I ended up having it three meals in a row.

 

Split Pea, Lentil, & Potato Soup

Ingredients

  • 3 small baked potatoes
  • 2/3 cup green split peas
  • 1/2 cup lentils
  • 1/2 cup torn kale
  • 1 tbsp dried onion
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 1 tbsp garlic salt

Instructions

  1. In a sauce pot, throw in diced baked potato, peas, and lentils. Cover with water, plus about 1 inch. If your potatoes aren't cooked yet, boil those for 15 minutes before adding the other legumes.
  2. After boiling 10-15 minutes, add in the kale and seasonings. Stir well, and continue to simmer another 10 minutes or so. The longer you simmer the soup, the more the ingredients will fall apart.
  3. If you don't like chunks, you can certainly use an immersion blender or a regular blender in batches to create a puree. But I liked the slightly chunky potato and the still-detectable little peas and lentils.
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Less than 5: Quick Miso Soup

 

I am a huge fan of most all Japanese foods, especially sushi. As evidenced from my ill-fated attempts at Salmon Nigiri and Lazy Won-Ton Soup, I am by no means a Japanese chef. But I do try, so I feel like I get some credit for that.

This is my super fast and easy imitation miso soup. Keep in mind I had no miso paste, which kinda makes the soup… so if you do, add that! If not, this is sort of close. You will need some specialized ingredients, but honestly most common grocery stores like King Soopers are now carrying similar items in their “ethnic” section.

Ingredients:

  • 1 bunch scallions
  • 1 tbsp duck paste (you can use chicken bouillon too)
  • 2-3 sheets seaweed
  • 1/2 block tofu
  • Optional: 1 pack ramen noodles

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Step 1: Slice the tofu into small squares. Cut the seaweed into strips. Slice all the green part of the scallions diagonally.

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Step 2: Bring the water to a boil and stir in the duck paste or chicken bouillon. Add the scallions, seaweed, and tofu. And that’s it!

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This soup is delightfully salty and packs a heavy umami punch.

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Add some glass or ramen noodles for extra filling power. You can have this soup as an appetizer, part of a light lunch, or as a whole meal. Quite healthy, if you’re ok with a high-ish sodium content… you can omit the bouillon but the taste will suffer.

Slow Cooker Red Pozole with Pork

 

So I’ve been tutoring a high school kid in Biology for a year. He’s great, as are his parents. And his mother is a large part Native American. She is an amazing cook, I often show up to tutor and/or leave to tempting smells wafting from the kitchen. They are kind enough to ask me to share their dinner with them quite often.

As I love cooking myself, typically I have dinner already started in the Crock pot or at least plans, so I decline. However, one night she was serving up this thick, red stew that smelled too irresistible. This was my first introduction to pozole.

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Pozole means “foamy”; also spelled “pozolli” or “posole”. It is a traditional stew originally from Mexico, which once had ritual significance due to its use of maize, called hominy. The word “hominy” comes from the Powhatan language word for prepared maize. (Maize is corn).

Hominy is a very interesting thing. To make it, you take regular corn kernels, dry it, and then treat it with an alkaline agent to break down the cellulose in the corn. The result is puffy, chewy, soft kernels that look a little bit like corn-shaped popcorn.

Well, this tomato-pork-hominy stew was unlike anything I’d ever had, so of course I had to ask for the recipe. She had gotten it from the Denver Post a few years back, and was more than happy to share it with me.

red posole with pork

The red pozole with pork is the recipe I used and show here, but there is also one for Green Pozole with Chicken. I’ll save that for another day.

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I wanted to try this right away, but I forced myself to be patient. Normally I just center my grocery shopping around sales, but this time I kept an eye out for the ingredients I needed. Anytime I want to make something with a unique or expensive ingredient I try to wait to maximize my food dollars. As soon as I saw hominy on sale at the local Save-A-Lot I snagged a can.

As is my way, I took the recipe, tweaked it a bit to what I like and what I had in the house, and it turned out wonderful! I don’t like spicy foods, so I left out the peppers, but I did throw in a pinch of dried chipotle pepper to keep the Native American feel of the recipe. If you want to go all the way and buy the exact spices called for, be my guest. But I omitted the Mexican oregano, and used regular paprika, not Spanish. I also added a can of red beans for extra fiber and filling power.

Slow cooker red pozole with pork:

  • 1.4 pound pork roast
  • 2-3 tbsp garlic powder
  • 1/2 tbsp cumin
  • Pinch chipotle pepper
  • 1 tbsp chili powder
  • 2 tbsp paprika
  • 1 whole white onion, diced
  • 1 can diced tomatoes, with liquid
  • 1 can red beans, drained
  • 1 29oz can hominy
  • 6 chicken bouillon cubes and ~24 oz water
  • 3 tbsp flour
  • 1 bottle beer (Colorado native)

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Step 1: In slow cooker, mix flour, beer, spices, diced onion, and tomato.

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Step 2: Heat water in the microwave for 2-3 minutes, dissolve the bouillon cubes and add to crock pot. Or just use chicken stock.

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Step 3: Dice the pork roast into bite-sized cubes. I had a 1.4-pound roast defrosted, so I used that. But you could use chops also.

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Peel or cut off fatty pieces to make it more lean.

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Step 4: Add the pork and hominy to the slow cooker. Cook on low 6-8 hours, or high 2-4 hours.

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The finished product is a complex but light stew, with an amazing depth of flavor. You can obviously add more spice to your taste, but I loved it the way it was. I also didn’t have ground cumin, so the little pieces were annoying at the bottom, but the flavor they added was worth it.

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I made some biscuits to serve with the posole, and my s.o. loved it too. The recipe suggests shredded cabbage, radish, cilantro, cheese, or sour cream as garnishes. If you add extra flour or cornstarch you can make it thicker, add more stock to make it more soup-like.

 

What’s your favorite slow cooker meal?

 

 

Broccoli-Cheddar Soup Bread Bowl

Broccoli cheddar soup is definitely one of my favorite go-to soups. It is relatively easy and quick to make, and I almost always have frozen broccoli on hand. I’ve tried several ways, adding and taking out ingredients as I had them available, but this batch was the best by far. It was thick, smooth, and creamy, with a perfect balance of flavors. I had some large bread rolls so I hollowed them out to use as bread bowls, and it was a perfect meal. Try it yourself!

Ingredients:
2 cups chicken stock
1 cup milk
1 cup frozen broccoli florets
1/2 cup sour cream or plain yogurt
1/2 cup shredded sharp cheddar
3-4 tbsp butter/margerine
Salt & black pepper

Step 1: In a sauce pot, bring butter, chicken stock and milk to a simmer. Cook the broccoli for 5-10 minutes, until heated through and soft.

Step 2: In a blender, combine the soup, spices, cheese, and sour cream. [You can use an immersion blender if you’re fancy enough to have one] Reserve 1 cup if you want broccoli chunks in the finished soup. Blend until smooth and return to the pot. Heat through, about 5 minutes.

Step 3: Hollow out a large round bread roll by cutting at an angle with a sharp knife all along the edges. Pull the middle out, and fill with hot soup. Sprinkle a little cheddar on top, and enjoy!


This soup was so good I had to have two bowls. Luckily the bread roll was big enough that I had plenty left for dipping. If you’d like to make this vegetarian soup vegan, just omit the milk and cheese, maybe use some vegan cheese product instead.


What’s your favorite soup to eat in a bread bowl?


Less than 5: Big-kid Ramen

Another in my “Less than 5” recipe series. All recipes beginning with that title will have less than 5 ingredients and/or cost less than $5. Bonus for ones that also take less than 5 minutes. =)
 
Ramen used to be the greatest after-school snack ever. Then in college, it was pretty much a daily staple. At 10-20 cents per pack, the good people of Ramen keep poor college kids worldwide from starving. When I started graduate school, and started taking this blog more seriously, I figured Ramen was no longer part of my life. I had graduated to frittatas, lasagna, and white bean chicken chili. Big kid food. 
But then in my masters study, my Taiwanese advisor had Ramen for lunch nearly every day. She just fancied it up by adding a handful of fresh spinach and an egg. Well of course I had to try it, as the chicken-salt smell of Ramen is hard to resist. Adding veggies ups the nutritional value (which previously was negative zero) and an egg or tuna will bump up the protein.

It turns out to make a decently healthy meal, for way less than a dollar per serving. Ever since then, when I have a random Ramen craving, I give in with the justification that at least it’s “big kid” Ramen. Now you can too!


Ingredients:
1 package Ramen noodles
1 cup frozen mixed vegetables or spinach
1 egg
Spices (I used parsley, parmesan, and red chili pepper for kick)

Step 1: Heat the noodles and water for 3 minutes in the microwave. Let stand for another 3 minutes.

Step 2: Add the vegetables and egg. Break the yolk so it doesn’t explode. Microwave another 3 minutes.

Step 3: Stir in seasoning packet and spices, enjoy!

The chili flakes gave it a nice bite of heat, and I like the frozen mixed veggies because of the corn and carrots’ sweetness. You can get creative with this. Use tofu, beans, tuna, chicken. Any cooked vegetable will work well. I’m partial to the chicken flavoring only, but there are beef and shrimp flavorings too. For 0.10 (noodles) + 0.10 (egg) + 0.10 (frozen veg) = $0.30 not a bad meal!


What do you put in your Ramen?


Under 100 Calories per Bowl: Cruciferous vegetable soup

 

I’m always a big fan of recipes that help “clean out the fridge or pantry“, and if they are healthy as well then bonus! We all have some assorted cans, boxed, half bag of frozen mixed vegetables, etc. that have been sitting around since approximately we moved into whatever abode we inhabit. Even the most strict, list-making, meal-planning, leftover-eating of us have odds and ends we need to try to use up before expiration dates. It is especially hard with produce. I have a bad habit of buying everything that’s on sale, I want to cook eventually, sounds healthy… and then I have a fridge packed full of five-day-old veggies beginning to wilt and lose nutrients. Sad face. 
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That’s why this soup is fantastic! You can mix and match what vegetables you add based on what you have waiting to be used, and choose whatever protein and grain is in the half-empty box in your cupboard. There is of course a few caveats. You need a huge ratio of veggies to other stuff, and a large portion of it must be water. IF you are going for a filling, vegetarian, healthy, low-cal, low-fat soup. Try to choose mostly cruciferous vegetables and/or leafy greens, as those pack the most nutrients and fiber for the least carbs and calories. And limit the beans and the grains to one cup each. If you have a “meat tooth” feel free to throw in some cooked shredded chicken or steak.
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Ingredients:
1 whole head green cabbage, shredded
1/2 head cauliflower, cut into florets
1/2 bunch kale, chopped
1 cup fresh spinach
1 cup barley
1 cup pinto beans
1 can diced tomatoes
Garlic salt
Lots of water (stock or bouillon for extra flavor)

Step 1: Chop all your veggies and add to the crock pot. Add the grain (barley) and protein (beans) as well as diced tomatoes. You can sub fresh chopped tomato or tomato sauce, or get rid of it. I just super love diced tomatoes in all the things.

Step 2: Cook on low for 4-6 hours, until veggies, barley and beans are tender. Add any other seasonings you like. Enjoy for under 100 calories per bowl as often as you are hungry!
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*Disclaimer: I do not recommend crash diets like the cabbage soup diet where this is all you eat all day, but I do believe that soup before a full meal will help dampen hunger and make it easier to eat healthy and manage a healthy weight.

 

 

 


Nutrition Facts

 

  12 Servings

Amount Per Serving

  Calories94.1  Total Fat1.0 g     Saturated Fat0.2 g     Polyunsaturated Fat0.4 g     Monounsaturated Fat0.2 g  Cholesterol0.0 mg  Sodium766.7 mg  Potassium412.5 mg  Total Carbohydrate18.8 g     Dietary Fiber5.1 g     Sugars1.2 g  Protein4.2 g

 

 
  Vitamin A 42.4 %
  Vitamin B-12 0.2 %
  Vitamin B-6 10.1 %
  Vitamin C 73.5 %
  Vitamin D 0.0 %
  Vitamin E 1.5 %
  Calcium 7.6 %
  Copper 5.7 %
  Folate 21.8 %
  Iron 8.9 %
  Magnesium 9.1 %
  Manganese 19.7 %
  Niacin 5.6 %
  Pantothenic Acid     3.7 %
  Phosphorus     7.5 %
  Riboflavin 6.2 %
  Selenium 6.0 %
  Thiamin 7.5 %
  Zinc 4.2 %
 
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.